How to make a Twine Globe Lantern and what they don't warn you about it.

DIY Twine Globe Lantern

DIY Twine Globe Lantern

Like a moth to a flame, I am always liking or saving pins with these cool looking twine globes in the pictures. I decided, enough just liking, let's do this! So what is my first step? Pinterest of course. The first step is what are people calling this awesome home décor piece? Rope ball? Twine Lantern? Twine Sphere? I found that most people are referring it as twine globes. First check off the list- name. The next step in my research is finding out how to make these amazing globes. I looked all through pinterest and YouTube and found some decent post. All seemed totally doable and with very little supplies. Yay! Let's get started. Here are the supplies.

The supplies

The supplies

You will need:

- Bouncy plastic air-filled ball(I got mine from Walmart)

- Roll of twine, cotton yarn or jute ( I choose jute because I wanted a very natural look. Jute is a   fibrous twine, made out of vegetable, soaks up well and is strong)

- All purpose glue, two large bottles (approx. 12 oz. - I know you see a large gallon of Elmer's glue in this picture, but you do not need to get such a large size. My daughter is obsessed with making slime, so I went big on the glue)

- 15 ft. Lighting swag kit ( I got mine from Cost Plus World Market)

- Light bulb ( you can get fancy and get an Edison style or LED, whatever you prefer and fits into the socket)

- Two garbage bags

- Two large bowls

- one electrical light plate cover (not shown, will explain later)

Most important step! Making a Poncho. Only one video had this as a first step and it is a life saver! Don't skip this step- it's a Must Do!

making a plastic poncho 

making a plastic poncho 

It's time to make the glue solution. The recipe is almost equal proportion of glue to water, I would say 80% water to glue and you will use around 12 oz. of glue. This amount was just enough for this size ball. Pour accordingly to ball, but it's better to have more than not enough. It's no fun when your hands are covered in glue and you have to stop wrapping the twin around the ball to make more glue solution. Once you have your solution made, it's time to submerge the roll into the solution.

Submerging the roll of twin into the glue solution

Submerging the roll of twin into the glue solution

Now is when the messy fun begins. I have to warn you- unlike the other post I have read. You do have to grab the ball and hold it close to your chest as you are wrapping the twine all around the ball. Make sure that when you are wrapping it, that the twine goes completely under and around. The twin can some times slip away and then cause looseness on the wrapping and you do not want that because when it dries it wont look like a tight weave. The goal when wrapping is to make criss cross formations. This will help make the globe hold up stronger, plus it will make the design look even more interesting.

 

Get ready to get really into it!

Get ready to get really into it!

I used the whole roll of Jute Twine and at the very last piece of the twine I create a knot with another piece. One Extra Tip to note: some blogs tell you to draw a circle so you try to make an opening for your swag lighting later, but that is NOT REALISTIC. When you have glue flying around everywhere and you have glue dripping from your armpits- yes armpits. I say screw the drawn in circle.

 

Thank goodness for the poncho!

Thank goodness for the poncho!

Instead, right after you tie the last of the twine and wash off the glue, go back to the sphere and while it is still wet, make an opening with your fingers by separating a spot at the top of the ball. You will have to let it fry for at least 24 hours. Once it dries the shape of the opening will take shape.

Skip trying to wrap around a drawn circle, just make an opening when it's still wet.

Skip trying to wrap around a drawn circle, just make an opening when it's still wet.

Next step is one of the most satisfying- deflating the ball. I used a drill bit to puncture through the plug of the ball. If I had to mark anything - it would be the plug! That thing is hard to find behind all the twine. I stuck the drill bit into the plug and jiggled it and it slowly released the air. Once you can start seeing the ball deflate, you can poke the ball again with whatever sharp device to help make a larger hole and to help speed up the process. Once it is all deflated remove the ball.

 

Remove the deflated ball

Remove the deflated ball

Now it's time to add the light kit swag. To help keep the bulb centered and in place. I also grabbed a light plate cover and stuck the socket through. I think the plate helps stabilize and keeps the light bulb in place.

Added the light plate cover to the swag to help keep the bulb in place.

Added the light plate cover to the swag to help keep the bulb in place.

The last step is to screw in the light bulb- INSIDE of the globe. This part was a little awkward and tricky. Have you ever screwed in a light bulb with one hand?

Me, trying to concentratescrewing a light bulb with one hand!

Me, trying to concentratescrewing a light bulb with one hand!

While still trying to also hold the swag in the same hand? It was a little terrifying- didn't want to hurt the globe! But after repeating to myself- "righty, tighty". It was in and voila! a twine globe lantern.

It was pretty easy- just MESSY! But life is too short to have a little glue get in the way.

Happy wrapping!

- Valerie